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Archive for the ‘Industry News’ Category

It’s tough to beat bacon. (Though we nearly did)

In Industry News on April 19, 2015 at 5:55 pm

Rapid City-based marketing and communications firm Jackalope earned six American Advertising Awards® at the 2015 AAF-District 8 Regional Competition in Minneapolis, Minnesota, for work created on behalf of Black Hills Ammunition and Jackalope. The wins mark the sixth consecutive year that the firm has represented AAF-Black Hills and the greater Black Hills advertising community at the regional level. AAF-District 8 is comprised of local AAF affiliated organizations from South Dakota, North Dakota, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.

Jackalope was the only agency outside of Minneapolis to be awarded gold. In fact, the firm’s identity program earned the second highest marks in the entire professional body of work behind BBDO Minneapolis best of show entry, Driven by Bacon.

With over 60,000 annual entries, the American Advertising Awards® are the world’s largest and arguably toughest advertising competition. Each year the competition begins at the local level with 210 AAF clubs across the country. Entries must first be submitted in a local competition to be eligible for regional and national competitions. Local winners advance to one of 14 regional district competitions and District winners advance to the national finals. The National American Advertising Awards® are held in conjunction with the AAF National Conference; June 10-13, 2015, in Las Vegas, NV.

Winning advertisers featured in the 2015 AAF District 8 ADDYs competition included Colle + McVoy, BBDO Minneapolis, Target, Olson, and Sioux Falls agencies Fresh Produce and Media One.

Jackalope Winning Entries-

Gold, Black Hills Ammunition
Elements of Advertising, Brand Video Cinematography

Silver, Black Hills Ammunition Brand Video
Elements of Advertising, Brand Video Copywriting

Out here, freedom isn’t a state of mind.

It’s land so vast and open and rugged, it makes

everything it touches wild.

It brought us here, this land. Called us.

To witness the arc of the earth.

The grass that stretches farther than any eye will ever see.

And the sky, always the sky, bigger than anything that

ever was or ever will be.

But for those of us who came here, we didn’t come to

see how small we really are.

We came to see just how big we can become.

The Black Hills of South Dakota.

The place that made the people, who make the best ammo on earth.

Gold, Black Hills Ammunition
Elements of Advertising, Color Photography Campaign

BHA2014-032new BHA2014-026color BHA2014-010color

BHA 2015 Product Catalog

BHA 2015 Product Catalog

Silver, Jackalope
Elements of Advertising, Logo

Jackalope logo v1

Gold, Jackalope
Collateral Material, Poster

IMG_5851

Gold, Jackalope
Advertising Industry Self-Promotion, Identity Program

IMG_5977 IMG_6003 IMG_5945

A full list of 2015 AAF-District 8 American Advertising Awards winners can be viewed here.

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Jackalope is an advertising agency. It is also a mythical animal that rewired the laws of nature to create something the world never even knew it needed. The truth lies somewhere in between. We’re an ad agency that doesn’t look, act or think like an ad agency. We work with people whose companies we believe in. And our job is to gather up whatever weird and wonderful tools we can find and convince the world to believe in those companies like we do.

To get in touch, call (605) 430-5407 or drop us a line at alleyjas@gmail.com

Advertising can stand to do a little more

In Agency News, Industry News, Integrated Campaign on December 8, 2012 at 10:02 am

Student Photos

Excerpts from a Letter to the Editor
Native Sun News – http://www.nsweekly.com
June 20-27 Issue
Reprinted with permission.
Special thanks to editor Jesse Abernathy
We rarely have time to reflect back on accomplishments or jobs well done. And by “we”, I mean we as a society. We as an industry. We as a marketing and communications firm. In this hustle-bustle, get-it-all-done-yesterday world that we’ve created, those times of reflection are ultimately saved only for special occasions like birthdays, anniversaries, and retirement.

But not today.

Today, I want to reflect on the accomplishments of an Introduction to Business class from Oglala Lakota College in Pine Ridge. This spirited group of civic-minded students are working hard to better their community. They believe in the place they live. They believe in each other. More importantly, they believe in the future of their people. They passed out hundreds of disposable cameras to Lakota children. There were no rules about what to take photos of or what’s appropriate. The only direction that came with the camera was a question: What does hope look like to you?  This collection of nearly 2,000 photos figured prominently in a suicide awareness campaign that launched on the reservation in the Fall.

I trust that you will consider attending the opening viewing of this art installation on December 14 in the Dahl Arts Center’s Inez & Milton Shaver Gallery. The display will be open for viewing from 4:00pm-6:00pm with a special program to follow in the adjacent Cyclorama Room. The exhibit will be open to the public through December 31, 2012.

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Humbly, I want to thank that class for what they taught me. That group of Lakota college students gave me a first glimpse into a world that few advertising professionals truly understand. And they gave me a view into a way that life can be lived that surprised me, that invigorated, and enlightened me. They showed me, perhaps for the first time, the true relevance of working in advertising. More importantly, they serve as an important example for our local advertising community. Do something to better your community. Do something to change social forces. Do something to battle societal perceptions. Do something that won’t show up in your company’s bottom line. Do something.

The incalculable genius of Albert Einstein perhaps said it best: “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.”

Jason Alley
Creative Director/Principal, Message
Board Member, Black Hills Chapter of the American Advertising Federation

 

Tell More Stories. Make Less Ads.

In Industry News, Storytelling on August 13, 2012 at 10:03 am

“Nobody reads ads. People read what’s interesting. Sometimes it’s an ad.” Famed ad man Howard Gossage’s timeless words serve as a guiding reminder to those of us who create messages on a daily basis, and to the clients who pay agencies to shape them.

Simply put, advertising is interruption. We are the distraction between pages of the latest issue of Vanity Fair, the banner ad above the online feature news story in the Rapid City Journal, the seemingly endless line of billboards between Box Elder and Spearfish, or that commercial before the season finale of Breaking Bad. No one actively seeks our messaging, but we must find and engage interested recipients nonetheless.

I believe the key lies in being meaningful and relevant, no matter where your message runs. Too often, advertisers respond with the wrong solutions. They become loud. Attention seeking. Obnoxious, Stir crazy. Or overly dependent on special effects. No matter what it takes or costs in the end. But these solutions only build consumer resentment and resistance. In the communication business, being meaningful and relevant ties back to the most human and ancient art form – storytelling.

I want to use this opportunity to invite everyone to take part in an evening that has the ability to change your perception on the relevance of storytelling forever. On September 14, the Black Hills chapter of the American Advertising Federation will host Jay O’Callahan, believed by many to be the world’s greatest living storyteller. He will perform  “Forged in the Stars” a story commissioned by NASA (Yes, that NASA) for their 50th anniversary.

O’Callahan has performed at the Abbey Theatre in Dublin, National Theatre Complex in London, the Olympics, Lincoln Center, and the Boston Symphony Orchestra, The Associated Press called him, “a theater troupe inside one body,” and the National Endowment of the Arts awarded him a fellowship for solo performance excellence.

I had the opportunity to witness a Jay O’Callahan performance at the 2012 OTA Sessions in Sioux Falls. As a speaker, an attendee, even a host of sorts, I’ve been to a lot of conferences in the past three years. And no matter the city, no matter the industry, no matter the audience, the topic that unquestionably attracts the most attention is social media. Yet, I’d wager that the majority of OTA attendees would say the most inspiring session was not about social media. General consensus was that the best session was about good old-fashioned storytelling. Nearly 300 creative, marketing and advertising professionals sat in absolute silence for well over an hour smitten by the effortless grace of someone who’s tirelessly perfected their craft. It was a subtle reminder that Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, blogs, online reviews, you name it, are all just tools that need to be anchored by good stories to garner attention and maximize effectiveness. Tweet that.

Jay O’Callahan’s September 14th performance at the Dahl Arts Center is essential for anyone directly or indirectly involved with marketing, advertising, strategic development, corporate communication, social media, design, copywriting and the like. That’s because everyone in the industries above tell stories. The core values of your organization tell a story. The search function on your website tells a story. The wording on your performance review forms tells a story. The shape of your business card tells a story. The kerning in your logo tells a story.

Sure, storytelling can sometimes be a formidable task. But, when in doubt remember Gossage. Stand for something. Be clear. But most of all, be interesting. Jay O’Callahan, without exception, is the greatest living embodiment of all the above.

Watch Jay O’Callahan’s discussion and a short segment from “Forged in the Stars”

Register here to attend Jay O’Callahan’s Dahl Arts Center performance of “Forged in the Stars”

Learn more about AAF-Black Hills

AAF-Black Hills Membership Options

Advertising can stand to do a little more

In Agency News, Industry News on June 21, 2012 at 11:26 am

Letter to the Editor
Native Sun News – http://www.nsweekly.com
June 20-27 Issue
Reprinted with permission. Special thanks to editor Jesse Abernathy


We rarely have time to reflect back on accomplishments or jobs well done. And by “we”, I mean we as a society. We as an industry. We as a marketing and communications firm. In this hustle-bustle, get-it-done-yesterday world that we’ve all created, those times of reflection are ultimately saved only for special occasions, anniversaries and retirement.

But not today.

Today, I want to reflect on the accomplishments of an Introduction to Business class from Oglala Lakota College in Pine Ridge. This spirited group of civic-minded students are working hard to better their community. They believe in the place they live. They believe in each other. More importantly, they believe in the future of their people. They passed out hundreds of disposable cameras to Lakota children. There were no rules about what to take photos of or what’s inappropriate. The only direction that came with the camera was a question: What does hope look like to you?  This collection of photos will figure prominently in a suicide awareness campaign set to launch on the reservation in the Fall.

I trust that you will consider attending the opening viewing of this art installation on June 22 at the Little Wound Elementary School Auditorium in Kyle. The display will be open for viewing from 4pm-5:30pm with a special program to follow.

Humbly, I want to thank that class for what they taught me. This class of college students gave me a first glimpse of a world that few advertising professionals truly understand. And they gave me a view of a way that life can be lived that surprised me, that invigorated and enlightened me. They showed me, perhaps for the first time, the relevance of working in advertising. More importantly, they are a shining example to our local advertising community at large. Do something to better your community. Do something to change social forces. Do something that won’t show up in your company’s bottom line. Do something.

The incalculable genius of Albert Einstein perhaps said it best: “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.”

Jason Alley
Creative Director/Principal of Message
Board Member of the Black Hills Chapter of the American Advertising Federation